Day 54 – Whiteboarding Hooke’s Law

WP_20161123_13_20_46_Pro.jpg
Physics 11 – Students presented their results on whiteboards today. In one class it is like pulling teeth to get students to talk in a whiteboard meeting. It is incredibly frustrating. I spoke with a few students after class, and they thought that maybe 1/2 the class was actually able to answer or question things that were said during the meeting, but chose not to.

Students did a good job of determining that the slope of the line on a Fs vs x graph is the stiffness of the spring, so that was pretty cool. Many groups didn’t think to find the equation of the line which was another beat my head against the wall moment. I really would like to get a modeling workshop here in Vancouver so I can improve on this aspect in my classes. Students are slowly coming around to the idea of modeling physics, but other details like having the kids take over discussions in class, along with timing on topics, continue to elude me.

Day 16 – Mistake Game

20160927_145507.jpg20160927_144820.jpg
Physics 11 – Today was the physics’ students first shot at the mistake game. The above picture shows a group’s work on a ranking question.

As well, I handed back last day’s quiz on graphing, best fit lines, slopes and models. I asked students to look at three other quizzes to compare mistakes. They then had to write down the three most common mistakes and hand this sheet in to me. This is my attempt to stop them from repeating the same old mistakes time and time again…

Day 10 – Buggy Whiteboards

WP_20160919_11_03_32_Pro.jpgconcensus.PNG
Physics 11 – I did a lot of talking again today, which was expected but still a bit disappointing.  It was the first board meeting I had with one class, and they were very quiet and unsure of what to say, ask or critique.

The top picture shows some good analysis and you can see the influence of math in the notation. We later talked about better symbols to use, and why a decimal is better than a fraction in this context.  The bottom picture is a screen grab from the consensus we came to for making whiteboards and models.  This class didn’t have anyone generalize the model, so I had to go over that part.

Next the students will have some practice moving through different representations (words, graphs, motion maps), which will highlight how they all apply to the same model.

Day 8 – Buggy Whiteboarding

T-041928444353 - WIN_20160915_100827.JPG

Physics 11 – Today was the students’ first shot at whiteboarding models that they’ve developed.  The photo above is interesting because during their presentation, this group realized that the direction on their graph was wrong.

The group below has a valuable statement on possible errors in data:

t-041928444353-win_20160915_100805

And the group below were the only ones that got to point of getting a mathematical model of the buggy motion. They had some good things to say with their presentation, more than what is shown here.

t-041928444353-win_20160915_100847

 

Day 122 – Whiteboarding CoM

COM.PNG

Physics 11 – Whiteboarding last day’s results was the main even for today but I forgot to take pictures.  By going around the room from whiteboard to whiteboard I posed the question, “what pattern do you see?”  Inevitably the students start to see that in each case, the moment of the objects before the interaction is equal to the momentum of the objects afterwards.  Ah ha! Conservation of Momentum!

I then showed the students how conservation of momentum can also be seen as a consequence from Newton’s Third Law.

 

Day 36 – The Mistake Game

WP_20151030_13_04_07_Pro

Physics  11 – Today the physics classes did group whiteboard problems and presented their work to the class.  We used the Mistake Game, where each group had to include a mistake on their whiteboard.  In the above example students did not convert from km/h to m/s.   It was a great way to reinforce the idea that we have to work with common units when doing our calculations.

Day 28 – Mini Whiteboards and Plickers

WP_20151019_14_37_23_Pro

WP_20151019_13_04_31_Pro

Physics 11 – This year every student of mine has their own Plicker card.  In previous years I kept one laminated set of plickers but it was a bit of a pain to work with.  It took time to hand out and collect, and it was too difficult to ensure that each student had the card number that they were assigned to. What I did this year was combine a plicker with mini whiteboards.  Each student received a plicker card printed on regular A sized paper, one A sized sheet of card stock. These where then slid inside a plastic sheet protector and voila!  Not only do they have a plicker card but they have an erasable surface for questions that involve writing down an answer or graph.  For example, I can ask students to predict the v-t graph of an object’s motion.  I still use Peer Instruction with Plickers and it continues to be a solid system to use.